Recently Transcribed Letters

March 8th, 1863

From Cecil Burleigh |

Stafford Court House, VA, March 8th 1863

Dear Wife,

It being a dark and gloomy day my thoughts turn naturally towards my home and dear friends that gather around the old fireside and try to cheer each other with the sunlight of love when the natural sun is obscured by clouds. I don’t know why it is, but if I am ever homesick it is when the sun is shut out from the world, and nature seems to mourn its loss. So today I am not exactly homesick but I should like right well to be with you today and to pass the Sabbath in my own home, surrounded by love, and comforts, unknown in the Army but I am

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March 4th, 1863

From Cecil Burleigh |

March 4th, 63

Camp near Stafford Court House, VA

Dear Wife,

I feel entirely unfit to write such a letter as I want to this morning, the excitement of the last two weeks, and the depression of spirits (in consequence of leaving home) has unnerved me and I feel unfit for any kind of duty, but I must do something or I shall die off with the blues. I have material enough for a long and interesting letter, but I fear I shall fail to make it so.

I will commence from the time I left home and try and give you a history of my journey down to the present time. After I left you, I tried to cheer

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March 1st, 1863

From Cecil Burleigh |

Washington D. C. March 1st

Dear Wife,

We arrived here last night at five o’clock. We had a comfortable journey but the thoughts of our dear home and friends prevented it from being a pleasant one. I felt pretty blue but have tried to keep up good courage. I can’t but believe I am to see you again and that before many months.

The great battles that are now organizing it seem to me must terminate one way or the other. I have no time [to] write much for we are behind time so good day, give my love to all, and may God bless and protect you.

C. Burl

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March 1st, 1863

From Cecil Burleigh |

Washington D. C. March 1st, 63

Dear Wife,

When I sent you that short line this morning I thought I should be in camp before this time but the prospect is that I shall stay in Washington two or three days yet. I closed my letter very suddenly this morning under impression that I had no time to spare but I find I have plenty to see the Eliphant and all the other interesting sights about town.

You must not be alarmed about me for I am not staying here for pleasure and haven’t any time to, but a circumstance happened last night that created quite an excitement here, though I understand such things are quite common here.

After looking

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